Picture of the Letter T
 

Elizabethan Insults - Letter T

  • Have fun with some Elizabethan Insults.
  • Read the Elizabethan Insults used by William Shakespeare

  • A selection of Elizabethan Insults from the plays written in the Elizabethan era

Picture of the Letter T

Elizabethan Insults - Letter T

 

Picture of the Letter T

Elizabethan Insults beginning with the Letter T
The following Elizabethan Insults dictionary contains words and phrases from the plays of William Shakespeare.

 
 
 That same purpose clanger, that sly devil, that broker that still breaks the pate of faith, that daily break vow (King John)
That there should be small love amongst these sweet knaves, and all this courtesy, the strain of man's bred out into baboon and monkey (Timon of Athens)
That were to enlard his fat already pride (Troilus and Cressida)
The common people swarm like summer flies (Henry VI Part 3)
The complaints I have heard of you I do not all believe;'tis my slowness that I do not, for I know you lack not folly to commit them and have ability enough to make such knaveries yours. (All's well that ends well)
 
The food is such as hath been belched on by infected lungs (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
The music of his own vain tongue doth ravish like enchanting harmony (Love's Labour Lost)
The pox upon her green sickness (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
The tartness of his face sours ripe grapes, when he walks he moves like an engine and the ground shrinks before his treading (Coriolanus)
The terror of the French, the scarecrow that affrights our children so. (Henry VI Part 1)
The very butcher of silk button (Romeo and Juliet)
The wicked fire of lust have melted him in his own grease (The Merry Wives of Windsor)
There are a sort of men whose visages do cream and mantle like a tanding pond (The Merchant of Venice)
 There is mischief in this man (King Henry VIII)
There is neither honesty, manhood or good fellowship in thee (Henry IV Part 1)
There is no more valour in that Poins than in a wild duck (Henry IV Part 1)
There is not yet so ugly a fiend of hell as thou shall be (King John)
There's many a man hath more hair than wit (Comedy of Errors)
There's small choice in rotten apples (The Taming of the Shrew)
They were the most needless creatures living (Timon of Athens)
Think'st thou, though her father be very rich, any man is so very a fool to be married to hell? (The Taming of the Shrew)
This bawd, this broker, this all changing word (King John)
This butcher's cur is venom mouthed (King Henry VIII)
This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse, there was no money in it. Not Hercules could have knocked out his brains for he had none (Cymbeline)
 
This is the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet (King Lear)
This is the silliest stuff that I ever heard (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
This woman's an easy glove, my lord, she goes off and on at pleasure (All's well that ends well)
Those healths will make thee and thy state look ill (Timon of Athens)
Thou art a boil, a plague sore, an embossed carbuncle in my corrupted blood (King Lear)
Thou art a traitor, false to thy gods, thy brother and thy father (King Lear)
Thou art like the harpy, which, to betray, dost with thine angels face, seize with thine eagle's talons (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
Thou art more deep damned than Prince Lucifer (King John)
Thou art the rudeliest welcome to this world (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
Thou cruel, ingrateful, savage and inhuman creature (Henry V)
Thou crusty batch of nature (Troilus and Cressida)
Thou damned and luxurious mountain goat (Henry V)
Thou damned tripe visaged rascal (Henry IV Part 2)
 
 
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death (Romeo and Juliet)
Thou didst drink the stale of horses and the guilded puddle which beasts would cough at (Antony & Cleopatra)
Thou disease of a friend (Timon of Athens)
Thou dost over ween in all (Titus Andronicus)
Thou fresh piece of excellent witchcraft (The Winter's Tale)
Thou halfpenny purse of wit, thou pigeon egg of discretion (Love's Labour Lost)
Thou has no more brain than I have in mine elbows (Troilus and Cressida)
Thou hast need o fmore rags to lay on thee (The Winter's Tale)
Thou haught insulting man (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
Thou little thing better than earth (Pericles, Prince of Tyre)
Thou lump of foul deformity (Richard III)
Thou misshapen Dick (Henry VI Part 3)
Thou most lting slave (The Tempest)
Thou odoriferous stench, sound rottenness (King John)
Thou sodden witted Lord (Troilus and Cressida)
 Thou unfit for any place but hell (Richard III)
Thou whoreson zed, thou unnecessary letter (King Lear)
Thou wrong'st a gentleman who is as far from thy report as thou from honour (Cymbeline)
Though stool for a witch (Troilus and Cressida)
Though thing of no bowels, thou (Troilus and Cressida)
Though you bite so sharp at reasons, you are so empty of them (Troilus and Cressida)
Thy bones are hollow, impiety has made a feast of thee (Measure for Measure)
Thy detestable bones (King John)
Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat (Romeo and Juliet)
Thy mothers name is ominous to children (Richard III)
Thy sin is not accidental, but a trade (Measure for Measure)
Tis thy presence that exhales blood from cold and empty veins where no blood dwells (Richard III)
Toads, beetles, bats, light on you (The Tempest)
 

Interesting examples of Elizabethan Words beginning with the Letter T
The above online Elizabethan Insults dictionary contain old Elizabethan phrases beginning with the Letter T providing a valuable reference source when studying the literary works and plays of the famous Elizabethan author William Shakespeare.

Elizabethan Language Guide - An Elizabethan Online Dictionary
Click the following links to access more information about the old English Elizabethan Language and the Elizabethan Online Dictionary for an easy to follow Elizabethan language guide!

 

Elizabethan Online Dictionary
Elizabethan Language
Elizabethan Insults
Elizabethan Education - Schools and Universities

Elizabethan Insults - Letter T

  • Have fun with some Elizabethan Insults.
  • Read the Elizabethan Insults used by William Shakespeare

  • A selection of Elizabethan Insults from the plays written in the Elizabethan era
 
 

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Elizabethan Insults - Letter T

 

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